The Endless Frontier Act

Grants and Bureaucracy

The majority of the document is about the bureaucratic overhead. We are very clear that the grant awards are going to happen on a competitive basis. Do you
award grants, on a competitive basis,
This will just further entrench

Note that while it ‘averages’ to $20B a year, it’s actually 2, 8, 20, 35, 35.

It specifies exactly what the money can be used for may be used for the purchase of equipment, the support of graduate students and postdoctoral researchers, and the salaries of staff.

CONSIDERATIONS FOR DESIGNATION AND 2 GRANT AWARDS.—In selecting an eligible consortium that submitted an application under paragraph 4 (4)(A) for designation and support under paragraph 5 (1)(A), the Secretary shall consider, at a minimum, 6 the following:
(A) The potential of the eligible consortium to advance the development of new technologies in a key technology focus area.
(B) The likelihood of positive regional economic effect, including increasing the number of high wage jobs, and creating new economic opportunities for economically disadvantaged populations.
(C) How the eligible consortium plans to integrate with and leverage the resources of one or more university technology centers established under section 8A(c)(6) of the Act of May 19 10, 1950 (64 Stat. 149, chapter 171; 42 U.S.C. 20 1861 et seq.) in a related key technology focus area.
(D) How the eligible consortium will engage with the private sector, including small and medium-sized enterprises to commercialize new technologies and develop new supply chains in the United States in a key technology focus area.
(E) How the eligible consortium will carry out workforce development and skills acquisition programming, including through the use of apprenticeships, mentorships, and other related activities authorized by the Secretary, to support the development of a key technology focus area.
(F) How the eligible consortium will improve science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education programs in the identified region in elementary and secondary school and higher education institutions located in the identified region to support the development of a key technology focus area.
(G) How the eligible consortium plans to 18 develop partnerships with venture development organizations and sources of private investment in support of private sector activity, including launching new or expanding existing companies, in a key technology focus area.
(H) How the eligible consortium plans to organize the activities of regional partners in the public, private, and philanthropic sectors in support of the proposed regional technology hub, including the development of necessary infrastructure improvements and site preparation.
(I) How the eligible consortium plans to 5 address economic inclusion, including ensuring 6 that skill development, entrepreneurial assist7 ance, and other activities focus on economically 8 disadvantaged populations. `

  • U.S. Senator Todd Young (R-Ind.), Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.), Congressman Ro Khanna (D-Calif.), and Congressman Mike Gallagher (R-Wis.)
  • Lots of noise around china
  • $100B over five years
    • AI/Machine Learning

The newly-established Technology Directorate would receive $100 billion over five years to lead investment and research in artificial intelligence and machine learning; high performance computing; robotics, automation, and advanced manufacturing; and more. An additional $10 billion would be authorized to designate at least 10 regional technology hubs, awarding funds for comprehensive investment initiatives that position regions across the country to be global centers for the research, development, and manufacturing of key technologies.

This is a great move because leveraging existing universities will yield much more bang for the buck than trying to build new research parks.

The technology directorate of the proposed NSTF would have the ability to organize DARPA-like projects in addition to traditional research efforts.

  • Bloomberg

Key areas
‘(A) INITIAL LIST.—The initial key tech15 nology focus areas are— 16 ‘‘
(i) artificial intelligence and machine 17 learning; 18 ‘‘
(ii) high performance computing, 19 semiconductors, and advanced computer 20 hardware; 21 ‘‘
(iii) quantum computing and infor22 mation systems; 23 ‘
‘(iv) robotics, automation, and ad24 vanced manufacturing; 13 ROM20523 S.L.C. BX6 F6 50W 1 ‘‘
(v) natural or anthropogenic disaster 2 prevention; 3 ‘‘
(vi) advanced communications tech4 nology; 5 ‘‘
(vii) biotechnology, genomics, and 6 synthetic biology; 7 ‘‘
(viii) cybersecurity, data storage, and 8 data management technologies; 9 ‘‘(ix) advanced energy; and 10 ‘‘
(x) materials science, engineering, 11 and exploration relevant to the other key 12 technology focus areas described in this 13 subparagraph.

These can only be changed every four years

Prioritize univerisities for funding

They’re talking more about reports than how the whole thing will work

Each year, the Director shall 3 prepare and submit a report to Congress, and shall 4 simultaneously submit the report to the Director of 5 the Office of Science and Technology Policy, describ6 ing the interagency cooperation that occurred during 7 the preceding year pursuant to this paragraph, in8 cluding a list of—

‘‘(AA) innovations de21 rived from research carried 22 out under item (aa), through 23 such activities as proof-of24 concept development and 25 prototyping, in order to re- 22 ROM20523 S.L.C. BX6 F6 50W 1 duce the cost, time, and risk 2 of commercializing new tech3 nologies; and 4 ‘‘(BB) through the use 5 of public-private partner6 ships; and

‘‘(A) PROGRAM AUTHORIZED.—The Direc10 tor shall establish a program in the Directorate 11 to award grants, on a competitive basis, to in12 stitutions of higher education or consortia de13 scribed in paragraph (3)(A)(i)(III)— 14 ‘‘(i) to build capacity at an institution 15 of higher education and in its surrounding 16 region to increase the likelihood that new 17 technologies in the key technology focus 18 areas will succeed in the commercial mar19 ket; and 20 ‘‘(ii) with the goal of promoting ex21 periments with a range of models that in22 stitutions of higher education could use 23 to— 24 ‘‘(I) enable new technologies to 25 mature to the point where the tech

A grant awarded under this subparagraph for a 7 purpose described in clause (i) or (ii) may also 8 enable the institution of higher education or 9 consortium to provide training and support to 10 scientists and engineers who are interested in 11 research and commercialization, if the use is in12 cluded in the proposal submitted under sub13 paragraph (B).

USE OF FUNDS.—A recipient of a 5 grant under this paragraph shall use grant 6 funds to reduce the risks for commercialization 7 for new technologies developed on campus, 8 which may include—

—The Direc8 tor, acting through the Deputy Director, shall 9 establish a program in the Directorate to award 10 grants, on a competitive basis,

may be used for the purchase of 2 equipment, the support of graduate stu3 dents and postdoctoral researchers, and 4 the salaries of staff.

‘‘(e) AREAS OF FUNDING SUPPORT.—Subject to the 14 availability of funds under subsection (f), the Director 15 shall, for each fiscal year, us
So many restrictions

of $100,000,000,000 for fiscal years 2021 23 through 2025, of which— 24 ‘‘(A) $2,000,000,000 is authorized for fis25 cal year 2021; 39 ROM20523 S.L.C. BX6 F6 50W 1 ‘‘(B) $8,000,000,000 is authorized for fis2 cal year 2022; 3 ‘‘(C) $20,000,000,000 is authorized for fis4 cal year 2023; 5 ‘‘(D) $35,000,000,000 is authorized for 6 fiscal year 2024; and 7 ‘‘(E) $35,000,000,000 is authorized for 8 fiscal year 2025.

‘‘(B) ELIGIBLE CONSORTIA.—For purposes 14 of this section, an eligible consortium is a con15 sortium that— 16 ‘‘(i) includes— 17 ‘‘(I) an institution of higher edu18 cation; 19 ‘‘(II) a local or Tribal govern20 ment or other political subdivision of 21 a State; 22 ‘‘(III) a government of a State or 23 the economic development representa24 tive of a State; and 44 ROM20523 S.L.C. BX6 F6 50W 1 ‘‘(IV) an economic development 2 organization or similar entity that is 3 focused primarily on improving 4 science, technology, innovation, or en5 trepreneurship; and

CONSIDERATIONS FOR DESIGNATION AND 2 GRANT AWARDS.—In selecting an eligible consortium 3 that submitted an application under paragraph 4 (4)(A) for designation and support under paragraph 5 (1)(A), the Secretary shall consider, at a minimum, 6 the following: 7 ‘‘(A) The potential of the eligible consor8 tium to advance the development of new tech9 nologies in a key technology focus area. 10 ‘‘(B) The likelihood of positive regional 11 economic effect, including increasing the num12 ber of high wage jobs, and creating new eco13 nomic opportunities for economically disadvan14 taged populations. 15 ‘‘(C) How the eligible consortium plans to 16 integrate with and leverage the resources of one 17 or more university technology centers estab18 lished under section 8A(c)(6) of the Act of May 19 10, 1950 (64 Stat. 149, chapter 171; 42 U.S.C. 20 1861 et seq.) in a related key technology focus 21 area. 22 ‘‘(D) How the eligible consortium will en23 gage with the private sector, including small24 and medium-sized enterprises to commercialize 25 new technologies and develop new supply chains 53 ROM20523 S.L.C. BX6 F6 50W 1 in the United States in a key technology focus 2 area. 3 ‘‘(E) How the eligible consortium will 4 carry out workforce development and skills ac5 quisition programming, including through the 6 use of apprenticeships, mentorships, and other 7 related activities authorized by the Secretary, to 8 support the development of a key technology 9 focus area. 10 ‘‘(F) How the eligible consortium will im11 prove science, technology, engineering, and 12 mathematics education programs in the identi13 fied region in elementary and secondary school 14 and higher education institutions located in the 15 identified region to support the development of 16 a key technology focus area. 17 ‘‘(G) How the eligible consortium plans to 18 develop partnerships with venture development 19 organizations and sources of private investment 20 in support of private sector activity, including 21 launching new or expanding existing companies, 22 in a key technology focus area. 23 ‘‘(H) How the eligible consortium plans to 24 organize the activities of regional partners in 25 the public, private, and philanthropic sectors in 54 ROM20523 S.L.C. BX6 F6 50W 1 support of the proposed regional technology 2 hub, including the development of necessary in3 frastructure improvements and site preparation. 4 ‘‘(I) How the eligible consortium plans to 5 address economic inclusion, including ensuring 6 that skill development, entrepreneurial assist7 ance, and other activities focus on economically 8 disadvantaged populations.

Conforming Amendments
(a) SCIENTIFIC AND ADVANCED-TECHNOLOGY ACT 23 OF 1992
(b) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION AUTHORIZA10 TION ACT OF 1998
(c) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION AUTHORIZA23 TION ACT OF 2002.
(d) AMERICA COMPETES ACT.—The America 22 COMPETES Act (Public Law 110–69; 121 Stat. 572) is 23 amended—
(e) NATIONAL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY, 12 ORGANIZATION, AND PRIORITIES ACT OF 1976
(f) AMERICA COMPETES REAUTHORIZATION ACT 25 OF 2010
(g) STEM EDUCATION ACT OF 2015.
(h) RESEARCH EXCELLENCE AND ADVANCEMENTS 17 FOR DYSLEXIA ACT
(i) AMERICAN INNOVATION AND COMPETITIVENESS 23 ACT
(j) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION AUTHORIZA9 TION ACT, 1976
(k) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION AUTHORIZA19 TION ACT, 1977
(l) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION AUTHORIZA25 TION ACT, FISCAL YEAR 1978
(m) ACT OF AUGUST 25, 1959.
(n) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION AUTHORIZA8 TION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 1980
(o) NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINIS15 TRATION AUTHORIZATION ACT OF 2005
(q) NATIONAL QUANTUM INITIATIVE ACT.
(r) CYBERSECURITY ENHANCEMENT ACT OF 2014
(s) HIGH-PERFORMANCE COMPUTING ACT OF 10 1991
(t) ARCTIC RESEARCH AND POLICY ACT OF 1984
(u) STEVENSON-WYDLER TECHNOLOGY INNOVATION 13 ACT OF 1980
(v) CYBER SECURITY RESEARCH AND DEVELOP17 MENT ACT
(w) NATIONAL SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND COMPETI12 TIVENESS ACT OF 198
(x) WEATHER RESEARCH AND FORECASTING INNO17 VATION ACT OF 2017.

https://www.young.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/Endless%20Frontier%20Act%20Bill%20Text%205.21.2020.pdf

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