Science is not enough

P11

  • Elegant analogy between the progress of science and quarrying to build an edifice
    P14
  • Calls out fallacy that scientists can create complete set of facts
    P16
  • Attributes to galleleo the experiment of building a philosophy based on observed facts
    P17
  • Equations led to the idea that everything will be described by equations
    P20
  • Calls out materialism as the state religion of soviet Russia
  • Good paragraph on science giving superpowers
    P22
  • Description of minds as ‘associative trai;s’
  • Good paragraph about science being an accumulation of data and how that data is collected
    P24
  • Many geometric possibilities
    P26
  • Example of how math that was created with no intention of usefulness became useful
    P29
  • Faith is necessary and is just separate from science
    P32
  • WWII led to us equating great wars with national suicide via science
  • though conspicuous, are a piffling minority is a great turn of phrase
    -P40
    Gentleman is someone full of humble pride who carries the culture
    P42
    Talks about an aristocracy of wealth and corporations controlling legislatures in the past tense
    P43
    Says that class distinctions are on the way out
    44,
    Defines culture as things outside the practical things of daily life
    46
    New definition of culture is a broad grasp of the world we live in
    Cultured people should know science + GREAT QUOTE
    47
    Computers will change human relations as much as printing did
    50
    Good management is an art
    51
    Technique underlies art and therefore management
    Like art, management is subject to change and fads
    52
    Leadership can come from artificial constraints or loyalty
    Management has become more complex but the techniques have been static
    Taxes, production, sales/marketing
    54
    Change from apprenticeship to rising through an org in different ways
    Change from singular ownership to distributed ownership
    55
    Can learn a little of an art by reading stories
    56
    Horatio nelson generated loyalty by being loyal to the cause and also by treating people as humans (“common humanity”)
    Example of the coxswain’s letter illustrates how there was an open line of communication
    Innovating- Example of Abouker Bay (1798) - tactics that went against the “rules of engagement”
    57
    Adapting is crucial in management
    58
    Delegating is essential for management
    60
    Larger corporations allow you to move someone around
    61
    Details matter
    The great decisions will never be made wisely unless the details are in order
    Good management involves backing people up, delegating, defending them, being the only one to give negative feedback.
    Delegation requires trust
    Managers must debate only internally
    Boss should not be loved, feared in a good way, admired and not come up with the ideas
    Boss should give credit, but not too ostentatiously
    69
    The mark of a true professional is the desire not for money or fame but for the respect of the other professionals
    70
    A good businessman balances stakeholders
    Asks reader to imagine a businessman they respect
    Business management has no honors or medals or degree or association
    73
    Claims businessman who cares only about money will soon cease to exist
    75
    Example of mendel’s discovery being unheard of for 30 years
    77
    Describes mind as working by ‘trails’ of association
    84
    Argues that Babbage and pascal failed to make computing machines because they could not be maintained- if pharoh had a car example
    86
    Example of vacuum unlocking thermionic tube
    Reliability unlocking applications
    87
    Talks about transistors and then says that magnetic tape might be the greatest advance
    Describes laser memory
    P88
    Describes requirements of memex independent of tech!
    Describes how technology can be used to forge events
    92
    Identifies access/selection - not memory speed or storage or display as the tricky part
    93
    Wonders whether in the future we will still use pens or keyboards and says that it would be easy to create an automatic stenographer
    101
    In memes revisited he focuses a lot on “threads”- creating sharing and replaying them. He underestimates how quickly computer costs came down
    “When bat meets ball” aka “lets science the shit out of baseball”
    Predicts moneyball by a lot
    124
    War, epidemics, and famines are what control populations
    125
    Asks whether the human population is self-regulating
    126
    Class may have evolved to regulate population
    127
    One hears a great deal about automation and cybernetics these days. There are prophets of doom among us. Their argument is that mechanization of industry will finally re¬ duce us to a race of slaves to the machine
    Correlary of being slaves to the machine is that totaltarianism would spread to the government
    128
  • Automation will erode society because it will eliminate low skilled labor
  • Societies can be integrated (like ants - individuals are subsumed) or associative (like a flock of birds - individuals remain viable)
    Specialization pushed people towards integrated society
    Asserts that automation will let us work less and that keeping up with the joneses is a corner case
    People will watch football if baseball gets too boring …
    130
    More resources lead to leaders over more people because a
    Points out that when you eliminate poverty you will invitably create parasites
    134
    Even if you eliminate poverty you will still have a class system
    In a village a large proportion of people could rise to preeminence
    In the globally connected world only a small proportion can
    137
    High inheritance taxes are a problem because the desire to do well for ones kids can be a useful motivator
    138
    Idea of a ‘village’ inside a city to elevate people who choose valuable but less globally flashy roles
    139
    Accomplishment is the greatest pleasure in life
    140
    Democracy requires enough people with skills and mindset to make it work
    No country is yet ready for direct democracy
    141
    American political system has moved more towards pure democracy
    143
    First penicillin treatment cost $50k - made in hundred of bottles of broth
    Pharma companies agreed to share research via a research committee
    Solution was a way to get the mold to grown in volume of broth and not just surface
    They also irradiated the mold to mutate it and get it to produce more penicillin
    145
    Price went from $50,000/dose to $0.20/dose
    Calls it a success of a system
    147
    Calls out increasing cost of healtcare
    148
    Surgeon sticking finger into heart valve
    149
    Calls out the fact that for the most part more money in 1965 didn’t buy you that much a better life and the danger that progress in medicine could change that
    151
    The mechanization of the handling of medical data promises to have a profound effect upon the efficiency of medical practice
    152
    The best people in the profession are the busiest and the least able to mold the national discussion
    153
    Calls out more distant relationships between doctors and patients (1965!)
    154
    Democracy needs a system to protect minorities
    It’s hard to build that system - it’s easy to be distorted^^^
    155
    Theoretically the Supreme Court should be protecting the minorities
    Bush is concerned the Supreme Court is legislating
    156
    Democracies do well when they’re made out of many small minorities
    157
    Contrast German respect for authority which arguably allowed Hitler with an American tendency to disregard laws
    158
    Describes professions as minorities within a system
    162
    Five kinds of people
  • Religious people
  • People who think we’re just deterministically part of the universe
  • People who think we’re just on the edge of discovering everything expontially
  • People who want to keep pushing forward
  • People who don’t think about it at all
    169
  • Even for deterministic people there are many reasons to wonder - negative time and possibilities of being cross sections of 4D objects etc
    172
    THINGS TO work on:
    Controlling weather
    Recovering materials
    177
  • People agree that we should make this a better world but don’t have a good objective by which to measure that
    178
  • James Joyce quote from The Moral Equivalent of War against just optimizing for pleasant utopia
    180
  • “Great mysteries” that our current techniques of science are pretty uselesss for
    182
  • Points how the brains of modern mathematicians and pythagoreans are working very differently
    183
  • He’s very worried about population
  • Argues that we need to survive to buy time because we have no idea how differently the minds of people in the future could work than ours do now
    191
    Human mission: to learn to understand
    192
    Need to continue to expand knowledge despite stress

  • Ediface analogy implicity ties to brutalist architecture - we cut out beauty for beauty’s sake

  • Is data-only philosophy the ultimate expression of the thing gallileo started?
  • Is it possible that like direct democracy, some secrecy in science could be good
  • Argument for optimism feels very similar to Stubborn Attachments
    - Ediface analogy implicity ties to brutalist architecture - we cut out beauty for beauty’s sake
  • Is data-only philosophy the ultimate expression of the thing gallileo started?
  • Is it possible that like direct democracy, some secrecy in science could be good
  • Argument for optimism feels very similar to Stubborn Attachments

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Authors

Vannevar Bush

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